Identification of Organ-Enriched Protein Biomarkers of Acute Liver Injury by Targeted Quantitative Proteomics of Blood in Acetaminophen- and Carbon-Tetrachloride-Treated Mouse Models and Acetaminophen Overdose Patients.

TitleIdentification of Organ-Enriched Protein Biomarkers of Acute Liver Injury by Targeted Quantitative Proteomics of Blood in Acetaminophen- and Carbon-Tetrachloride-Treated Mouse Models and Acetaminophen Overdose Patients.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsQin S, Zhou Y, Gray L, Kusebauch U, McEvoy L, Antoine DJ, Hampson L, Park KB, Campbell D, Caballero J, Glusman G, Yan X, Kim T-K, Yuan Y, Wang K, Rowen L, Moritz RL, Omenn GS, Pirmohamed M, Hood L
JournalJ Proteome Res
Volume15
Issue10
Pagination3724-3740
Date Published2016 Oct 07
ISSN1535-3907
Abstract<p>Organ-enriched blood proteins, those produced primarily in one organ and secreted or exported to the blood, potentially afford a powerful and specific approach to assessing diseases in their cognate organs. We demonstrate that quantification of organ-enriched proteins in the blood offers a new strategy to find biomarkers for diagnosis and assessment of drug-induced liver injury (and presumably the assessment of other liver diseases). We used selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry to quantify 81 liver-enriched proteins plus three aminotransferases (ALT1, AST1, and AST2) in plasma of C57BL/6J and NOD/ShiLtJ mice exposed to acetaminophen or carbon tetrachloride. Plasma concentrations of 49 liver-enriched proteins were perturbed significantly in response to liver injury induced by one or both toxins. We validated four of these toxin-responsive proteins (ALDOB, ASS1, BHMT, and GLUD1) by Western blotting. By both assays, these four proteins constitute liver injury markers superior to currently employed markers such as ALT and AST. A similar approach was also successful in human serum where we had analyzed 66 liver-enriched proteins in acetaminophen overdose patients. Of these, 23 proteins were elevated in patients; 15 of 23 overlapped with the concentration-increased proteins in the mouse study. A combination of 5 human proteins, AGXT, ALDOB, CRP, FBP1, and MMP9, provides the best diagnostic performance to distinguish acetaminophen overdose patients from controls (sensitivity: 0.85, specificity: 0.84, accuracy: 85%). These five blood proteins are candidates for detecting acetaminophen-induced liver injury using next-generation diagnostic devices (e.g, microfluidic ELISA assays).</p>
DOI10.1021/acs.jproteome.6b00547
Alternate JournalJ. Proteome Res.
PubMed ID27575953
Grant ListMR/L006758/1 / / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom